The PEMA Technique: Explaining the texture within the paintings

In my paintings with texture, the image for the painting rises out of the texture, which I lay down first. I collect random shiny and/or textured materials as I move through the day, holding things back from the trash and recycling and picking things up off the ground. When I collage them, I listen to podcasts and audiobooks and don’t think while I’m placing the materials. I then paint over that with a dark wash of black and purple or metallic colors. After it has dried, I stand back and let shapes wash over me. I turn it upside down and sideways until an image emerges. I then paint around that form and pull it out with thin washes, adding in details as necessary. I try to let the original collage peak through. The final painting is a part of my psyche at the time I found the image in the dark washed collage. I use the PEMA technique that professional artist Christine Kuhn of Flourish Studios taught me. She explains the origin of the name, “PEMA(c) means lotus in Sanskrit and is an acronym for “Perceive, Envision, Manifest and Analyze.”

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